Category Archives: History

The World’s Largest Ancient Stone Block Found In Baalbeck!

Posted By :

as Photo credit: Deutsches Archäologisches Institut.

German Archeologists have discovered right next to the “Hajar Al Hibla” in Baalbeck, or the stone of the pregnant woman, the biggest known ancient stone block. The stone is more than 20 meters long and weighs 1,650 tons. It was meant to be transported without being cut but archeologists will need to extend the trenches to determine its exact height.

Baalbeck is one of the largest Roman sanctuaries known and has some of the best preserved Roman ruins in Lebanon.

See that absurdly massive stone block? Yeah, that’s not the one we’re talking about. Look over to the right. German archaeologists working at the Baalbek site in Lebanon have uncovered the largest known ancient block.

The fully exposed block, which dates back to around 27 B.C., is the well known Hajjar al-Hibla. It’s located in a stone quarry at Baalbek, site of the ancient Heliopolis in Lebanon. Similar stone blocks measuring up to 20 meters (65 feet) in length and a diameter of 4 x 4 meters (13 x 13 feet) were used for the podium of the massive Temple of Jupiter in the Roman sanctuary of Baalbek.

Thanks Ibrahim Jouhari

20 Pictures Of Al Sa’eh Library in Tripoli Before It Got Torched

Posted By :

D7K_4251
Picture via Natheer Halawani

A lot of people haven’t unfortunately heard about this decades-old library in Tripoli up until it got torched today, so I did some research and pulled out old pictures and information about the library and its owner Greek Orthodox Priest Ibrahim Sarrouj.

Al Sa’eh Library was founded in 1970 by the Orthodox Youth movement and consisted of a single room. Few years later, the library published around 10 books. In the early 1980s, they gradually started releasing Orthodox publications. In 1983, Samir Makhoul, Toni Boulos, Ibrahim Sarrouj decided to expand the library and bought the warehouse next to it.

Nowadays, the library has over 80,000 books (not copies), out of which 400 rare books. One of the oldest book in this library according to Father Sarrouj is one that dates back to 1817 written by an American Colonel and is estimated at around $3,000. Speaking of Father Sarrouh who’s a highly esteemed and respected individual in Tripoli, he has shown great interest in Islamic Studies despite being a Greek Orthodox.

The loss of this library is a huge one for Tripoli and Lebanon as a whole. I wish officials would have taken the necessary precautions to preserve it and protect it from the assholes who burned it down.

Sources Used for Pictures and Information:
Dustywyndow.blogspot.com
TripoliScope.com
Mo5tar.com
eiwonder.blogspot.com

[nggallery id=53]

Beirut Photographer – Witness

Posted By :

An interesting documentary but let’s hope that will be the last war we hear about.

In 1981, George Azar, a Lebanese-American, crossed the Syrian border into Lebanon.

He carried an inexpensive camera, less than $100 and a desire to change the way the Arab world was portrayed by the US media. He began taking photographs. But within a few months Israel attacked Lebanon and war broke out.

Suddenly immersed in a world of gunfire and terror in an unfamiliar city, George chronicled the Palestine Liberation Organisation (PLO) guerillas, teenage snipers and civilians living through what became one of the bloodiest summers in the history of the modern Middle East.

Now, 30 years on, he returns to Beirut, retraces his steps and unpicks the stories and people behind some of his most iconic photographs – those that were published and many of which were unseen at the time.