Category Archives: Mags & Books

10 reasons why I love RAGMAG magazine

1- RAGMAG tackles all sorts of topics (art, theater, film, nightlife, music, cuisine, fashion, health etc …)
2- Their exclusive interviews are always a pleasure to read even if you don’t like the interviewee.
3- Their [website] looks very nice, is easy to browse and is always updated.
4- The Ragged highlights have some really cool sections, my favorites being “Hayda Lebnen ya 3ayne” and “FML
5- They are very active on Facebook, Twitter, Pinterest and don’t just post stuff but interact all the time with their readers/followers.
6- RAGMAG organizes giveaways/competitions all the time for its readers and fans and the prizes are really cool!
7- They have a refined taste in restaurants/hotels/pubs etc …
8- I got featured once in the magazine in the “Mon Amour, Mon Ami” section.
9- The people behind RAGMAG are hardworking, intelligent and very friendly. ( @Gina @Fida @Youmna @Danielle )
10- All of the above.

Boobs, Botox and the Babes of Beirut

I think this article is offensive, over-generalizing and pointless. [Article]

For a largely Arab country it’s a bizarre thing that in Lebanon (Beirut specifically), women care more about their appearance than men. Males lead a rather sullied existence, priming their closely cut mini-beards and, from my own observations, eating rather a lot. The formula in Lebanon’s capital for women is fashion-forward, from their choice of cloth to the decisions they make surgically. [Link]

Via Rita

Navigating Relationships in Lebanon

Some Lebanese take pride in how our society is a conservative one and still has values while in reality it’s asking guys to have Superman-like skills to navigate a relationship and make it endure.

I never thought I would be writing an article on relationships in Lebanon but somehow I ended up writing one that got published in RAGMAG’s July issue which is awesome. You can read the full article [Here].

Let me know what you think.

PS: Special thanks to RAGMAG’s team and Fida.

Amin Maalouf à l’Académie française


AP Photo/Jacques Brinon

What a great honour for Amin Maalouf and Lebanon!

France on Thursday granted one of its top honours, membership in the prestigious Academie Francaise, to Franco-Lebanese writer Amin Maalouf, whose books seek to build bridges between East and West. Maalouf became the first Lebanese inducted as an one of the academy’s “immortals” — the 40 lifelong members tasked as guardians of the French language. [DailyStar]

Amin Maalouf was born in Beirut, but moved to Paris with his family in 1975 after the civil war broke out. His most famous novel is “Sakhrit Tanios”, or “The Rock of Tanios“, for which he received France’s premier literary award, the Prix Goncourt.

Many foreign, mainly French papers, wrote about this achievement, including LeMonde.fr, LaPresse.ca, LeFigaro.fr and TheNational.ae among others.

Amin Maalouf was featured in CNN’s Inside the Middle East January edition as one of few people in the region “who are leading the fight to protect, promote, and adapt their heritage.” [CNN]

New History Book of Lebanon


[Source]

It is one thing to write history from a subjective point of view and a whole different thing to wipe out historical events.

For those of you unaware, there’s apparently a new history book that is due to be approved by our government, where key events in Lebanon’s history have been ignored, such as Zahle battle in 1981 or the invasion of the Baabda palace on the 13th of October 1990 by the Syrians and others. Those are two of the many historical events mentioned in the news.

It doesn’t matter who won this war or not, but history is for new generations to learn from, and must be as objective and informative as possible.

Update: Prime Minister Najib Mikati has suspended the proposal for this new book and asked to forget this issue for the time being, at least until a new history book that is accepted by all sides is proposed.

Cobra gold : the world’s biggest bank robbery

I was looking for articles on crimes in Lebanon when I fell on this 1976 fiction novel by a certain Damien Lewis.

Its summary goes as follows:

1976, war-torn Beirut city. Under the cover of a massive firefight, an unknown band of armed men blast their way into the Imperial Bank of Beirut. Over the next 48 hours they load up three trucks with gold bullion, and the raiders and the loot disappear forever.

Someone should make a movie out of it.

What can one buy for 30$ from Librairie Antoine?

I found in my wallet the other day a 52,000 LL voucher from Librairie Antoine that I had forgotten about. I passed by Librairie Antoine at ABC Dbayyeh to see if it’s still valid since it dated back from March and luckily I was told their vouchers never expire.

I had no clue what to buy since it’s been ages since I’ve gotten any books and prices were relatively high for any interesting book I checked, until I spotted L’eleve Ducobu comic books.

I bought two new publications for 51,000LL and was not reimbursed a 1000 LL because their accounting system requires that you buy with the same exact amount of the voucher or more. I didn’t argue though as I was in a hurry.

I read both issues the same night and they were as funny as always. Added to that, I just found out they released “L’eleve Ducobu” the movie two months ago.

BLED

I spotted this at Librarie Antoine and it brought back some good old memories from school.

Even though most students hated it back then, I was a big fan of grammar exams.