18 thoughts on “Ziad Rahbani at AUB

  1. Razor

    Now he reflects nothing. He studied the Lebanese pre-war society by hanging out at the Sanayea public park.
    I believe he is trying to capture something now from the society but he lost his skills.

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  2. Moe

    I got a sms about a concert he is doing too at le royal. And suddenly, everyone forgot l bahdale that he put everyone through after his last concert is that place in dbayeh too, i forgot the name of the place. Being a rahbani doesnt make someone untouchable you know

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  3. Ahmad Osman

    What a dogmatic, ossified thing he’s become, & in so doing he’s only reflected the Left’s overall turning into a caricature of its former self.

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  4. Anonymous

    I think the lady gave them only justice. 3ayb for them to disrespect someone like Ziad in that way. 3ayb to disrespect anyone in that way. He has the freedom of speech and opinion and if they don’t like it don’t come listen to him. Calling ziad a walad and a fachist makes them seem so low and makes their cause seem ridiculous and offensive. Aub has never seen such disrespect to any of it’s guests in the past few years like that.

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    1. X

      Just like he has the freedom of speech to state his opinions at AUB so do the protestors. Freedom of speech works both ways, and if you think only one side has the right to state their opinion then you don’t understand how freedom of speech works. AUB has always been about standing up to what you believe in and saying out loud and this is exactly what these people did.

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      1. Nour

        No one is saying that they cant state their opinion, what we are saying is that they should know how to do that with all respect and maturity! He didn’t disrespect any of them by stating his opinion and so they could have done!
        There’s a civilized way of stating your opinion and that doesn’t include humiliating your opponent.

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        1. X

          How was this humiliating? They were peacefully holding up signs and were shouted out and asked to leave. Protests in any “civilized” country are made up of just that: holding up signs with your opinion on them. I don’t see any other civilized way they could have sent their message across. Disrespecting him would have been to shout insults at him, which is actually what happened to the protesters. Just becuase Ziad Rahbani is considered a “saint” for work he did 30 years ago (which, by the way, is hypocritical of his opinions now) doesn’t make him immune to criticism.

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  5. Nour

    Someone’s political opinion is no one’s business! he has the right to believe whatever he thinks is right, and not agreeing with his opinion doesn’t give them the right to disrespect him regardless if he is a well none figure or not he still has the right to have his own opinion and what these guys did is very disrespectful and they are what’s wrong in our community we should respect everyone’s opinion whether we agree or not!

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    1. Darwish

      But Ziad in his criticism and opinions is known for his sharp and harsh words that can be disrespectful in the eyes of many… Why not the other side? And I am a fan of Ziad but one needs to be fair…

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  6. Darwish

    I am a fan of Ziad like many in Lebanon but I think the students have the right to express their opinion the way they did… Their method is a common thing in every modern country, peaceful and silent protesters holding banners… The miserable reaction is from the violent people in the room… The lady who stood up and was angry is the perfect example of one way thinking in our region… I am sure she is for the freedom of expression when she is talking about it but when it happens she become what she became… Now back to the banners, the same sarcasm that Ziad uses to criticize this and that, the students used in their clever banners puns… Either you agree with them or not, you are pro or against the revolution in Syria, they have the right to protest the way they did… But sadly, in a country like lebanon where people are elevated by their followers to mythological level, they become holy and immune of criticism in the eyes of their fans or followers… I agree with Ziad on many matters and visions but the other side has the right to oppose it and by using the same style Ziad uses (sarcasm and puns)…

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